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Title: Can't do it, won't do it! Developing a theoretically framed intervention to encourage better decontamination practice in Scottish dental practices
Authors: Bonetti, Debbie
Young, Linda
Black, Irene
Cassie, Heather
Ramsay, Craig R
Clarkson, Jan
Keywords: Decontamination
Dental care
Dentist's practice patterns
Issue Date: 5-Jun-2009
Publisher: BMC
Citation: Bonetti, D., Young, L., Black, I., Cassie, H., Ramsay, C.R., and Clarkson, J., (2009) Can't do it, won't do it! Developing a theoretically framed intervention to encourage better decontamination practice in Scottish dental practices Implementation Science, 4 (31).
Abstract: Background: Guidance on the cleaning of dental instruments in primary care has recently been published. The aims of this study are to determine if the publication of the guidance document was enough to influence decontamination best practice and to design an implementation intervention strategy, should it be required. Methods: A postal questionnaire assessing current decontamination practice and beliefs was sent to a random sample of 200 general dental practitioners. Results: Fifty-seven percent (N = 113) of general dental practitioners responded. The survey showed large variation in what dentists self-reported doing, perceived as necessary or practical to do, were willing to do, felt able to do, as well as what they planned to change. Only 15% self reported compliance with the five key guideline-recommended individual-level decontamination behaviours; only 2% reported compliance with all 11 key practice-level behaviours. The results also showed that our participants were almost equally split between dentists who were completely unmotivated to implement best decontamination practice or else highly motivated. The results suggested there was scope for further enhancing the implementation of decontamination guidance, and that an intervention with the greatest likelihood of success would require a tailored format, specifically targeting components of the theory of planned behaviour (attitude, perceived behavioural control, intention) and implementation intention theory (action planning). Conclusion: Considerable resources are devoted to encouraging clinicians to implement evidence-based practice using interventions with erratic success records, or no known applicability to a specific clinical behaviour, selected mainly by means of researchers' intuition or optimism. The methodology used to develop this implementation intervention is not limited to decontamination or to a single segment of primary care. It is also in accordance with the preliminary stages of the framework for evaluating complex interventions suggested by the medical research council. The next phases of this work are to test the intervention feasibility and evaluate its effectiveness in a randomised control trial.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2164/292
ISSN: 1748-5908
Appears in Collections:Applied Health Sciences research
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