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dc.contributor.authorShapovalova, Daria
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-24T11:11:00Z
dc.date.available2020-11-24T11:11:00Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-18
dc.identifier.citationShapovalova , D 2020 , ' Arctic Petroleum and the 2°C Goal : A Case for Accountability for Fossil-Fuel Supply ' , Climate Law , vol. 10 , no. 3-4 , pp. 282-307 . https://doi.org/10.1163/18786561-10030003en
dc.identifier.issn1878-6553
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 176511412
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 98bda0cf-1216-4fad-bc6b-baa146de9c1b
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85097305263
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2164/15402
dc.descriptionFunding Information: There is growing support for supply-side measures in general. Over 500 environmental ngo s from 76 countries signed the 2017 Lofoten Declaration calling for ‘the wealthy fossil fuel producers to lead in putting an end to fossil fuel development and to manage the decline of existing production.’ This position is supported by some politicians and industry representatives. In the last two years of the Obama Administration, for example, much attention was focused on climate change. In discussing the controversial Keystone XL Pipeline project, the US president said: ‘if we’re going to prevent large parts of this Earth from becoming not only inhospitable but uninhabitable in our lifetimes, we’re going to have to keep some fossil fuels in the ground rather than burn them and release more dangerous pollution into the sky.’ A 2016 report by the French energy company Total stressed that ‘the 2°C scenario highlights that a part of the world’s fossil fuel resources cannot be developed.’ The World Bank is no longer financing oil-and-gas projects, on climate change grounds. For the Arctic context specifically, Sjåfjell and Halvorssen examined the climatic implications of new oil development in Norway, arguing that investing in oil-and-gas operations and carbon-intensive infrastructure over the next thirty years in the Arctic ‘is clearly against the object and purpose of the unfccc and the Paris Agreement, when the international community should be phasing out fossil fuel use and moving toward renewable energy across the globe.’ Publisher Copyright: © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2020. Copyright: Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.en
dc.format.extent26
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofClimate Lawen
dc.rights© Daria Shapovalova, 2020 | doi:10.1163/18786561-10030003 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the cc by 4.0 license.Climate Law 10 (2020) 282-307 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectRussiaen
dc.subjectArcticen
dc.subjectgovernanceen
dc.subjectnorthen
dc.subjectsanctionsen
dc.subjectoil and gasen
dc.subjectfossil fuelsen
dc.subjectsupply sideen
dc.subjectArctic Oceanen
dc.subjectArctic petroleum productionen
dc.subjectArctic governanceen
dc.subjectinternational environmental lawen
dc.subjectGreenpeace v. Norway caseen
dc.subjectEnvironmental impact assessmenten
dc.subjectInternational environmental lawen
dc.subjectGreenpeace v. Norway case (People v. Arctic Oil case, Norwegian Court of Appeal, 2020)en
dc.subjectFossil fuelsen
dc.subjectSupply sideen
dc.subjectK Lawen
dc.subjectGE Environmental Sciencesen
dc.subjectLawen
dc.subjectManagement, Monitoring, Policy and Lawen
dc.subject.lccKen
dc.subject.lccGEen
dc.titleArctic Petroleum and the 2°C Goal : A Case for Accountability for Fossil-Fuel Supplyen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Aberdeen.Law (Research Theme)en
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Aberdeen.Lawen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Aberdeen.Centre for Energy Transitionen
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1163/18786561-10030003
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85097305263&partnerID=8YFLogxKen


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